Category Archives: Native Americans

a Red Clover at the center of the world

Finding each other’s capacity for brilliance

I watched Finding Forrester

 
last night. It reminded me of how we have allowed ourselves to embrace fear and the mediocrity of our stereotyped perception of one another to determine our collective course of action. 
 
This latest tragedy of the Grand Jury pardoning the homicide of Eric Garner in Staten Island is a symptom of how we perceive ourselves in the spectrum of the sream. 
 
Others can perceive us as ignorant or undeserving and pride can make us dig our heels into a chain reaction, but how we truly see ourselves can allow a break in the chain. We can transcend our guilt and avoidance by recognizing each other’s capacity for brilliance.
 
We just celebrated Thanksgiving, which for many has become a tradition of stuffing ourselves to the point of falling asleep because we have a hard time acknowledging that we repaid the courtesy the Native Americans showed to the pilgrims with genocide and reservations.
 
We downplay the brilliance and creative genius of Blacks in America because we are ashamed of slavery and inner city poverty. White people tend to have a homicidal chip on their shoulders. This may be because white is the abscence of color and we somehow don’t feel we fit into the spectrum of colors. So, we insist that we are beyond and above it; not a part of- but separate. 
 
The truth is we are all a part of the natural expanding universe, a part of the stream. While all ethnicity, races, cultures and religions have some natural spice to contribute to the overall flavor of life, all of us have access to the elementary beauty of what makes us move. To be alive is to surprise even ourselves.  Our stereotypes for each other may stem from our fear of the universe having no boundaries. We are a part of that. Surrender ignorance and you risk having your mind blown. If we can handle the pain of compassion we can choose to expand our hearts into the love that also has no boundaries.
 
May your week yield insight beyond annoyance.

 

Happy “Who discovered America?” Day!

Happy “Who discovered America?” day!  
Since it is a federal holiday in America and Columbus’ actions are hardly worth honoring, we could join Seattle and Minneapolis as they officially celebrate Indigenous People’s Day. However, although this seems like a step in the right direction, it isn’t nearly enough to really celebrate Native Americans, who discovered America 1,400 years before the lost  explorer, who wasn’t a very polite guest, usurped that title. So, let us take today and appreciate the wisdom that greeted us as we strove to create a land of freedom and liberty. 
While we are at it,  let’s celebrate one another too!
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Columbus Day Is Now Indigenous People’s Day in Seattle A…

Some cities seek to change the second Monday in October to a more politically correct, inclusive holiday
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“I salute the light within your eyes where the whole Universe dwells. For when you are at that center within you and I am that place within me, we shall be one.”

-Crazy Horse, Oglala Lakota Sioux (circa 1840-1877)

“In our every deliberation, we must consider the impact of our decisions on the next seven generations.”

– Iroquois Maxim (circa 1700-1800)

“Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.”

– Chief Seattle, Duwamish (1780-1866)

 

“Being Indian is an attitude, a state of mind, a way of being in harmony with all things and all beings. It is allowing the heart to be the distributor of energy on this planet; to allow feelings and sensitivities to determine where energy goes; bringing aliveness up from the Earth and from the Sky, putting it in and giving it out from the heart.”  

– Brooke Medicine Eagle

“We, the great mass of the people think only of the love we have for our land, we do love the land where we were brought up. We will never let our hold to this land go, to let it go it will be like throwing away (our) mother that gave (us) birth.”. – Letter from Aitooweyah to John Ross, Principal Chief of the Cherokee.

When you know who you are; when your mission is clear and you burn with the inner fire of unbreakable will; no cold can touch your heart; no deluge can dampen your purpose. You know that you are alive.

– Chief Seattle, Duwamish (1780-1866)